Definition

Pyloroplasty is surgery to widen the opening in the lower part of the stomach (pylorus) so that stomach contents can empty into the small intestine (duodenum).

The pylorus is a thick, muscular area. When it thickens, food cannot pass through.

Alternative Names

Pyloroplasty

Description

The surgery is done while you are under general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free).

The surgeon makes a cut in the belly area. If the surgery is done using a laparoscope, three smaller cuts are made instead.

The surgeon cuts through some of the thickened muscle so it becomes wider.

The cut is then closed in a way that keeps the pylorus open. This allows the stomach to empty.

The surgery usually takes 1 – 2 hours.

Why the Procedure Is Performed

Pyloroplasty is used to treat complications in patients with peptic ulcers or other stomach problems that cause a blockage of the stomach opening.

Risks

Risks of anesthesia include:

  • Reactions to medications
  • Problems breathing

Risks of any surgery include:

  • Bleeding
  • Infection

Risks of this procedure:

  • Damage to the intestine
  • Hernia
  • Leakage of stomach contents
  • Long-term diarrhea
  • Malnutrition
  • Tear in the lining of nearby organs (mucosal perforation)

After the Procedure

Most patients recover quickly and completely. The average hospital stay is 2 – 3 days. Most patients can slowly begin a regular diet in a few weeks.

Outlook (Prognosis)

After surgery, the health care team will monitor your breathing, blood pressure, temperature, and heart rate. Most patients can go home within 24 hours.

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