Alternative Names

Secondhand smoke – risks; Cigarette smoking – risks; Smoking and smokeless tobacco – risks; Risks of tobacco

Information

Tobacco is a plant. Its leaves are smoked, chewed, or sniffed for a variety of effects.

  • Tobacco is an addictive substance because it contains the chemical nicotine.
  • Tobacco contains more than 19 known cancer-causing chemicals (most are called “tar.”)

HEALTH RISKS OF SMOKING OR SMOKELESS TOBACCO

There are many more reasons to quit using tobacco. Knowing the serious health risks may help motivate you to quit. When used over a long period, tobacco and related chemicals such as tar and nicotine can increase your risk of many health problems.

  • Heart and blood vessel problems:
    • Blood clots and aneurysms in the brain, which can lead to stroke
    • Blood clots in the legs, which may travel to the lungs
    • Coronary artery disease, including angina and heart attacks
    • High blood pressure
    • Poor blood supply to the legs
    • Problems with erections because of decreased blood flow into the penis
  • Cancer (especially in the lung, mouth, larynx, esophagus, bladder, kidney, pancreas, and cervix)
  • Poor wound healing, especially after surgery
  • Lung problems such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis, or asthma that is harder to control
  • Problems during pregnancy, such as babies born at low birth weight, premature labor, miscarriage, and cleft lip
  • Other health risks or problems:
    • Decreased ability to taste and smell
    • Harm to sperm, which contributes to infertility
    • Loss of sight due to an increased risk of macular degeneration
    • Tooth and gum diseases
    • Wrinkling of the skin

Smokers who switch to smokeless tobacco instead of quitting tobacco completely still have a number of health risks:

  • Increased risk of mouth or nasal cancer
  • Gum problems, tooth wear, and cavities
  • Worsening high blood pressure and angina

HEALTH RISKS OF SECONDHAND SMOKE

Those who are regularly around the smoke of others (secondhand smoke) have a higher risk of:

  • Heart attacks and heart disease
  • Lung cancer
  • Sudden and severe reactions, including those involving the eye, nose, throat, and lower respiratory tract

Infants and children who are regularly exposed to secondhand smoke are at risk of:

  • Asthma (children with asthma who live with a smoker are much more likely to visit the emergency room)
  • Infections, including virus-caused upper respiratory infections, ear infections, and pneumonia
  • Lung damage (poor lung function)
  • Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

Like any addiction, quitting tobacco is difficult, especially if you are acting alone. There are a lot of ways to quit smoking and many resources to help you. See: Smoking – tips on how to quit

  • Family members, friends, and coworkers may be supportive or encouraging.
  • Talk to your doctor about nicotine replacement therapy and smoking cessation medications.
  • If you join smoking cessation programs, you have a much better chance of success. Such programs are offered by hospitals, health departments, community centers, and work sites. See: Stop smoking support programs

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