Coordinated Health

Conditions

Definition

This article describes the skills and growth markers relevant to 5-year-old children.

Alternative Names

Normal childhood growth milestones – 5 years; Childhood growth milestones – 5 years; Growth milestones for children – 5 years

Information

Physical and motor skill milestones for a 5-year-old child may include:

  • Gains about 4 – 5 pounds per year
  • Grows about 2 – 3 inches per year
  • Vision has reached 20/20
  • Erupting the first permanent teeth (most children do not get their first permanent teeth until age 6)
  • Developing increased coordination
  • Skipping, jumping, and hopping with good balance
  • Maintaining balance while standing on one foot with eyes closed
  • Showing increased skill with simple tools and writing utensils
  • Can copy a triangle
  • Spreads with a knife

Sensory and cognitive milestones:

  • Vocabulary increasing to over 2,000 words
  • Composing sentences of 5 or more words, and with all parts of speech
  • Identifying coins
  • Counting to 10
  • Knows telephone number
  • Properly naming the primary colors and possibly many more
  • Questioning more deeply, addressing meaning and purpose
  • Responding to “why” questions
  • Behaving more responsibly and apologizing for mistakes
  • Decreasing aggressive behavior
  • Outgrowing earlier childhood fears
  • Accepting other points of view (but may not understand them)
  • Demonstrating increased mathematical skill
  • Questioning others, including parents
  • Strongly identifying with the parent of the same sex
  • Having a group of friends
  • Engaging in imaginative play (for example, a trip to the moon)

Ways to encourage a 5-year-old’s development may include:

  • Reading together
  • Providing the necessary space for physical activity
  • Instructing the child to participate in — and learn the rules of — sporting activities
  • Encouraging the child to play with other children, which helps develop social skills
  • Playing creatively with the child
  • Monitoring both the time and content of television viewing
  • Visiting local areas of interest
  • Encouraging the child to take responsibility for small household chores, such as helping set the table or picking up toys after playing
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