Coordinated Health

Conditions

Definition

Blood pressure is a measurement of the force against the walls of your arteries as your heart pumps blood through your body. Hypertension is another term used to describe high blood pressure.

Hypertension"/>

Blood pressure readings are usually given as two numbers — for example, 120 over 80 (written as 120/80 mmHg). One or both of these numbers can be too high.

The top number is called the systolic blood pressure. The bottom number is called the diastolic blood pressure.

  • Normal blood pressure is when your blood pressure is lower than 120/80 mmHg most of the time.
  • High blood pressure (hypertension) is when your blood pressure is 140/90 mmHg or above most of the time.
  • If your blood pressure numbers are 120/80 or higher, but below 140/90, it is called pre-hypertension.

If you have heart or kidney problems, or you had a stroke, your doctor may want your blood pressure to be even lower than that of people who do not have these conditions.

Alternative Names

Hypertension; HBP

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Many factors can affect blood pressure, including:

  • How much water and salt you have in your body
  • The condition of your kidneys, nervous system, or blood vessels
  • Your hormone levels

Hypertension overview"/>

You are more likely to be told your blood pressure is too high as you get older. This is because your blood vessels become stiffer as you age. When that happens, your blood pressure goes up. High blood pressure increases your chance of having a stroke, heart attack, heart failure, kidney disease, or early death.

You have a higher risk of high blood pressure if:

  • You are African American
  • You are obese
  • You are often stressed or anxious
  • You drink too much alcohol (more than one drink per day for women and more than two drinks per day for men)
  • You eat too much salt in your diet
  • You have a family history of high blood pressure
  • You have diabetes
  • You smoke

Most of the time, no cause of high blood pressure is found. This is called essential hypertension.

High blood pressure that is caused by another medical condition or medication is called secondary hypertension. Secondary hypertension may be due to:

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Disorders of the adrenal gland (such as pheochromocytoma or Cushing syndrome)
  • Hyperparathyroidism
  • Pregnancy or preeclampsia
  • Medications such as birth control pills, diet pills, some cold medicines, and migraine medicines
  • Narrowed artery that supplies blood to the kidney (renal artery stenosis)

What is blood pressure?The correct answer is a measurement of the force against the walls of your arteries as your heart pumps blood through your body. Your blood pressure is reported as two numbers: systolic over diastolic blood pressure. If either number is too high, there will be extra stress on your heart and blood vessels. A common sign of high blood pressure is:The correct answer is none of the above. In most people, high blood pressure does not cause any symptoms. This means you may only find out about the problem when your doctor or nurse checks your blood pressure. Ask your doctor how to prevent high blood pressure.When blood pressure stays high, it can lead to:The correct answer is all of the above. Diagnosing high blood pressure early can help prevent these health problems. Get your blood pressure checked every two years if it was normal at your last reading and at least once a year if it was 120/80 or above. If you have high blood pressure, your doctor may ask you to check it at home. High blood pressure can cause the heart muscle to thicken.The correct answer is true. As the heart muscle works harder, it can become so thick that it doesn’t get enough oxygen. This can cause chest pain and may lead to heart failure. Heart failure occurs when the heart can’t pump enough blood to the rest of your body. Talk with your doctor about how to lower high blood pressure.High blood pressure can make the blood vessels wider.The correct answer is false. High blood pressure causes blood vessel walls to get thicker. Over time, fat and cholesterol can also build up on vessel walls. These two problems together cause blood vessels to become narrow, so blood can’t flow as freely. Reduced blood flow can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke.Which is a sign of decreased blood flow?The correct answer is all of the above. High blood pressure can raise your risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD). This is the narrowing of the vessels that carry blood to the legs and feet. PAD occurs most often in men over age 50. See your doctor if you have high blood pressure and notice any discomfort in your legs or feet.Which of the following are risk factors for stroke? The correct answer is all of the above. High blood pressure is the number one risk factor. A st
roke occurs when a blood vessel that supplies the brain bursts or gets blocked by a blood clot. The symptoms depend on which part of the brain is affected. Ask your doctor to explain warning signs of stroke.
Which is NOT a common warning sign of stroke?The correct answer is chest pain. If you notice any signs of stroke listed above, call 9-1-1 immediately. Prompt treatment can save your life. If the stroke is caused by a blood clot, a clot-busting drug may be given to dissolve the clot. For this drug to work, you must be treated 3 to 4 1/2 hours after symptoms first started.If high blood pressure affects your eyes, you might develop:The correct answer is all of the above. High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina, the part of the eye that changes images into signals the brain can read. You may not have symptoms at first. Tell your doctor right away if you notice any changes in vision.Symptoms of kidney disease appear immediately.The correct answer is false. Your kidneys remove wastes and excess water from your body. High blood pressure damages the kidneys, making it harder for them to function. Kidney disease often has no symptoms until a lot of damage has occurred. Controlling high blood pressure can protect your kidneys.

Symptoms

Most of the time, there are no symptoms. For most patients, high blood pressure is found when they visit their health care provider or have it checked elsewhere.

Because there are no symptoms, people can develop heart disease and kidney problems without knowing they have high blood pressure.

If you have a severe headache, nausea or vomiting, bad headache, confusion, changes in your vision, or nosebleeds you may have a severe and dangerous form of high blood pressure called malignant hypertension.

Signs and tests

Your health care provider will measure your blood pressure several times before diagnosing you with high blood pressure. It is normal for your blood pressure to be different based on the time of day.

  • All adults should have their blood pressure checked every 1 to 2 years if their blood pressure was less than 120/80 mmHg at their most recent reading.
  • If you have high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, kidney problems, or certain other conditions, have your blood pressure checked more often — at least once every year.

Blood pressure readings taken at home may be a better measure of your current blood pressure than those taken at your doctor’s office.

  • Make sure you get a good quality, well-fitting home blood pressure monitor. It should have the proper sized cuff and a digital readout.
  • Practice with your health care provider or nurse to make sure you are taking your blood pressure correctly.
  • Bring your home monitor to your appointments so your health care provider can make sure it is working correctly. 

Your health care provider will do a physical exam to look for signs of heart disease, damage to the eyes, and other changes in your body.

Tests may also be done to look for:

  • High cholesterol levels
  • Heart disease, such as an echocardiogram or electrocardiogram
  • Kidney disease, such as a basic metabolic panel and urinalysis or ultrasound of the kidneys

Treatment

The goal of treatment is to reduce your blood pressure so that you have a lower risk of complications. You and your health care provider should set a blood pressure goal for you.

Hypertension treatments"/>

If you have pre-hypertension, your health care provider will recommend lifestyle changes to bring your blood pressure down to a normal range. Medicines are rarely used for pre-hypertension.

You can do many things to help control your blood pressure at home, including:

  • Eat a heart-healthy diet, including potassium and fiber, and drink plenty of water.
  • Exercise regularly — at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise a day.
  • If you smoke, quit — find a program that will help you stop.
  • Limit how much alcohol you drink — one drink a day for women, two a day for men.
  • Limit the amount of sodium (salt) you eat — aim for less than 1,500 mg per day.
  • Reduce stress — try to avoid things that cause you stress. You can also try meditation or yoga.
  • Stay at a healthy body weight — find a weight-loss program to help you, if you need it.

Your health care provider can help you find programs for losing weight, stopping smoking, and exercising.

You can also get a referral from your doctor to a dietitian, who can help you plan a diet that is healthy for you.

There are many different medicines to treat high blood pressure.

  • Often, a single blood pressure drug may not be enough to control your blood pressure, and you may need to take two or more drugs.
  • It is very important that you take the medicines prescribed to you.
  • If you have side effects, your health care provider can substitute a different medicine.

Expectations (prognosis)

Most of the time, high blood pressure can be controlled with medicine and lifestyle changes.

When blood pressure is not well controlled, you are at risk for:

  • Bleeding from the aorta, the large blood vessel that supplies blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Heart attack and heart failure
  • Poor blood supply to the legs
  • Problems with your vision
  • Stroke

hypertension hypertrophy"/>

Calling your health care provider

If you have high blood pressure, you will have regular appointments with your doctor.

Even if you have not been diagnosed with high blood pressure, it is important to have your blood pressure checked during your yearly check-up, especially if someone in your family has or had high blood pressure.

Call your health care provider right away if home monitoring shows that your blood pressure is still high.

Prevention

The same lifestyle changes you may follow to help control your blood pressure will also help prevent high blood pressure from occurring in most people.

Related:Diabetes – what to ask your doctor – type 2, Heart failure – what to ask your doctor , High blood pressure – what to ask your doctor , Kidney removal – discharge, Diabetes – eye care, Diabetes – preventing heart attack and stroke, Diabetes – taking care of your feet, Diabetes – tests and checkups , ACE inhibitors, Heart attack – discharge, Angioplasty and stent – heart – discharge , Aspirin and heart disease, Butter, margarine, and cooking oils, Cholesterol and lifestyle, Clopidogrel (Plavix), Controlling your high blood pressure, Dietary fats explained, Fast food tips, Heart disease – risk factors, How to read food labels, Implantable cardioverter defibrillator – discharge, Low-salt diet , Mediterranean diet, Heart failure – fluids and diuretics, Heart failure – home monitoring, Heart failure – discharge, Cushing syndrome, Glomerulonephritis, Renal vein thrombosis, Acute kidney failure, Hemolytic-uremic syndrome, Henoch-Schonlein purpura, Polyarteritis nodosa, Radiation enteritis, Retroperitoneal fibrosis, Wilms tumor, Hypertensive heart disease, Heart attack, Heart Failure Overview, Hardening of the arteries, Aortic dissection, Injury – kidney and ureter, Stroke, Blindness and vision loss, Ventricular assist device, Obesity

EmailTwitterFacebookGoogle+LinkedIn